Irreconcilable Differences – Divorce in Mississippi

Welcome to the The Wade Law Firm, PLLC blog! If you’re looking for a Mississippi Family Law, Wills, Estates, or Life Planning attorney, you’ve come to the right place. With a focus on uncontested legal matters, our firm offers a range of counsel, compassion, and zealous advocacy to every client. Among other areas, The Wade Law Firm concentrates on legal issues that touch closest to home – Family Law.

One of the most common issues for families in Mississippi is divorce. The state of Mississippi has recognized twelve fault grounds for divorce available to one spouse when his or her partner is guilty of some serious wrongdoing. But what about when the marriage is just plain over? What happens when both the husband and the wife are ready to call it quits?

Mississippi recognizes a form of divorce known as “Irreconcilable Differences (ID)” divorce. Located at section 93-5-2 of the Mississippi Code, this is perhaps the most common form of divorce granted in the state.  Some people refer to this type of divorce as “no fault” because neither party has to prove fault of the other.

Spouses may not always agree on why a marriage has failed or who gets what when they decide to split up. Not to worry, an Irreconcilable Differences divorce may be an option… if they at least  can agree on going their separate ways. There are a few reasons for this, but the most common reason is couples would rather not “air their dirty laundry” in court. Also, because an ID divorce does not require one spouse to prove that the other partner is at fault, couples sometimes feel they are “saving face” by ending the marriage more peacefully through an ID divorce.

Like all divorce grounds, there are specific requirements that must be met for the court to grant a divorce on Irreconcilable Differences. An experienced attorney will know these factors backwards and forwards, but here are the basics:

  1. The couple must jointly file a complaint before the court. The couple should request the ID divorce together and in writing.
  2. The complaint should only identify ID as the grounds for divorce. If one spouse disagrees with the ID divorce, or would like to prove a fault ground instead, a divorce on the grounds of irreconcilable differences will likely not be granted.
  3. Finally, after filing the joint complaint, the court may not grant the divorce until at least 60 days later. This “cooling off period” is designed to make sure that both husband and wife are very sure that they desire a divorce. If they still want a divorce 60 or more days after initially requesting it, the court should grant the divorce.

Still, what about child custody? Or how to divide the couple’s property? The couple filing for an ID divorce has two options in sorting this out:

  1. Agree on everything – If the couple is able to decide themselves who should have custody of the children and who should keep what property, they can include this in their joint complaint for Irreconcilable Differences divorce. The judge will review this to make sure it is consistent with the best interests of any children involved and equitable to both parties and. If the agreement looks good, the judge will likely grant the divorce and include these terms.
  2. Agree on less than everything – Maybe the couple agrees on wanting a divorce, but not on who gets what. Maybe they agree on how to divide property, but disagree on who should have custody of the children. As long as the couple jointly files a complaint agreeing to ID divorce, they can leave these details to the court in the same way fault ground divorces proceed.

Divorce in Mississippi

As you can tell, getting a divorce on the grounds of Irreconcilable Differences is not quite as simple and easy as it sounds. Both the husband and the wife must file their joint complaint just right, and do quite a bit of work to settle any lingering disputes. This is why it is smart to hire a lawyer, especially when dealing with such an emotional issue like divorce.

If you would like help navigating the numerous legal, financial, and emotional aspects of divorce, contact us today. The Wade Law Firm, PLLC, Mississippi Divorce and Family Law Firm, is ready to answer your questions. Attorney Vangela M. Wade has over 18 years of legal experience helping countless clients in variety of difficult matters.

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Divorce in Mississippi: 4 Elements of Cruel and Inhumane Treatment

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Welcome to The Wade Law Firm, PLLC, Mississippi Family Law & Divorce Attorney blog site. If you’ve found yourself on our site, you’re at the right place to get a basic primer on important family law issues in Mississippi. Here, you’ll find the latest in our mini-series on the most common fault grounds of divorce in this state.

Today we will discuss “Cruel and Inhumane Treatment.” You can find the text of this fault ground in Mississippi Code Annotated at § 93-5-1, but here are a few key points.

First, like all fault grounds for divorce, the burden is on the spouse seeking the divorce to prove that the guilty spouse has done something wrong. The court must find that cruel and inhumane treatment is proven by “a preponderance of the evidence.” Loosely speaking, this means that the majority of the evidence must show that cruel and inhumane treatment has taken place.

When it’s time for the court to hear the evidence, the spouse seeking divorce must prove four elements have been met:

  1. Cruel Conduct
  2. Causal Connection
  3. Appropriate Timing
  4. Corroboration

Without proving all four of these factors, a divorce will not be granted on this specific ground.

  1. The Mississippi Supreme Court defined Cruel and Inhumane Conduct way back in 1930. Here’s a simplified version: The conduct must endanger life, limb, health OR create a reasonable fear of this kind of danger so that continuance of the marital relationship is unsafe for the innocent spouse.

Also, the conduct may be so unnatural and infamous that the marriage becomes revolting to the innocent spouse and he or she can no longer take part in the marriage. The obvious examples of cruel and inhumane conduct here are constant threats of violence, physical assaults, and similar mistreatment of children and relatives, but more may apply.

  1. Causal Connection requires that the guilty spouse’s conduct was the proximate cause of the couple’s separation. Basically, the spouse seeking a divorce must show that the poor conduct of the guilty spouse is the primary reason for the physical or emotional harm caused. This is harder to prove when the harm to the innocent spouse is emotional rather than physical, but it is possible (hence why you should always consult with a lawyer.)
  2. The Timing element requires that the guilty spouse’s cruel and inhumane conduct took place during the marriage. There are other concerns, as well. For example, one instance of abuse will likely not be enough to justify ending a 21 year marriage on these fault grounds. Also, if the mistreatment took place for a long time, yet it has not happened again during the past three years, the timing element might not be met.
  3. Finally, there must be Corroboration of the evidence. Someone other than the innocent spouse must also testify that the cruel treatment has taken place. Friends, family, healthcare employees, or other professionals often provide corroborating evidence. For example, a daughter may testify that she has seen one spouse assaulting and hurting the other. In another scenario, a psychiatrist may testify to the court that the innocent spouse is suffering from mental issues that are consistent with someone who has been severely emotionally abused.

If the spouse who wants a divorce can prove all four of these elements, he or she will likely be entitled to a divorce on the grounds of Cruel and Inhumane Treatment. Again, this blog only covers the basics of this fault ground, and you should consult with an attorney if you think you may need a divorce on these grounds.

Are you looking for a Divorce Attorney in Mississippi? Get in touch with me, Vangela M. Wade at The Wade Law Firm in Jackson, MS. With more than 18 years of legal practice and knowledge of Mississippi Family Law, The Wade Law Firm, PLLC is committed to serving all of our clients with the utmost expertise, diligence, and care and are here to help you navigate through difficult legal matters.

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Divorce in Mississippi: The 3 Elements of Desertion

Welcome to the The Wade Law Firm, PLLC‘s, Mississippi Family Law and Divorce Attorney, blog site. As a full service law firm, our legal team offers a range of counsel, compassion, and zealous advocacy to every client. Among other areas, The Wade Law Firm concentrates on legal issues that touch closest to home: Family Law.

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When a divorce in Mississippi becomes necessary, it’s often because the couple just cannot get along or the relationship has become far too unjust or dangerous to one of the spouses involved. Often the couple is still living together or has at least some relationship at the time that divorce proceedings begin. However, sometimes a divorce isn’t pursued until one spouse has made it extremely clear that he or she is no longer willing to take part in the relationship at all. This is when one of the twelve fault grounds for divorce in Mississippi may be triggered – desertion.

Desertion is one of the fault grounds listed by law in the Mississippi Code Annotated at § 93-5-1. The law provides the much of the full story on how one spouse may prove desertion, but we’re going to cover some of the basics.

In the State of Mississippi, desertion is defined as one spouse’s, “willful, continued, and obstinate desertion for the space of one year.” Let’s break down that definition to see just what it means…

To prove desertion, there are three key points that the spouse seeking a divorce must prove to the court:

1. That the defendant (the deserting spouse) was absent for one year.

A court may not find that a spouse has deserted his or her marriage partner until he or she has been continuously absent for at least one full year. This is fairly straightforward, but it’s important to note that the yearlong period must be complete and unbroken. That means that even a short return home may sometimes stop the clock from ticking.

Example: A spouse may not have met the one-year term if he or she is gone for one year, except for spending time with his or her spouse during the Christmas holidays. Also, if the deserting spouse returns to salvage the marriage in good faith, but is sent away by his or her partner, the one-year period has not been met. The spouse must be absent from the marriage for a full year.

2. That the defendant intended to abandon the marriage.

The deserting spouse must have been absent from the marriage in a “willful and obstinate” fashion. Essentially, this means that he or she must have been absent with the intent to abandon the marriage. The spouse’s absence must not have had another legitimate reason other than a desire to leave the marriage.

Example: A spouse leaving for a lengthy military deployment overseas or even to seek a job in another state likely does not qualify as intent to abandon the marriage. Of course, proving a spouse’s reason for leaving may be difficult. That is why the courts are here, and why it is always smart to have an attorney by your side when litigating these matters.

3. That the plaintiff (the spouse seeking divorce) did not consent to the separation.

Finally, the spouse seeking a divorce on the grounds of desertion must prove to the court that he or she didn’t consent to the deserting spouse’s absence. Desertion is a fault ground, so someone must have been wronged. If one spouse agreed to his or her partner’s decision to leave for a year or more, that spouse has essentially agreed to the absence. Therefore, no one has truly been deserted.

In short, the evidence in the case must show that one spouse intended to leave the marriage while the other was willing to continue the relationship.

Need Legal Guidance?

Now, these are only the bare bones of obtaining a divorce in Mississippi based on desertion. There are many more wrinkles to this story, and you need the advice of an experienced attorney if you need to navigate this issue. Attorney Vangela M. Wade has over 18 years of legal experience representing countless clients navigating a variety of difficult situations.

As one of Metro Jackson and Central Mississippi’s best family law attorneys, The Wade Law Firm, PLLC is ready to answer your questions! Give us a call at601.790.0043 or contact us online today to discuss your legal matters in a confidential, affordable consultation.

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12 Fault Grounds for Divorce in Mississippi

Welcome to the The Wade Law Firm, PLLC in Jackson, Mississippi blog site. As a full service law firm, our legal team offers a range of counsel, compassion, and zealous advocacy to every client. Among other areas, The Wade Law Firm concentrates on legal issues that touch closest to home – family law.

One of the more common reasons for consulting a family attorney is to consult and consider the subject of divorce. No one enjoys going through a divorce, but it is often one of the most important decisions a person will make in his or her life. The state of Mississippi has recognized this fact and outlined the twelve “fault grounds” for divorce. These are scenarios where one spouse may be entitled to a divorce based on the poor conduct of the other spouse.
We’ll go over twelve fault grounds for divorce allowed in the courts of Mississippi, but first we should discuss the eligibility requirements for obtaining a divorce in Mississippi.

Divorce in Mississippi

Only people who have been residents of Mississippi for at least six months may file for divorce in Mississippi. Our state has a policy of favoring marriage; it is generally good for families, particularly for the emotional and psychological development of children. Because of this, Mississippi is an easy place to get married, but requires a bit more to file for divorce.

If you’ve lived in Mississippi for at least six months, and are considering whether a divorce is a necessary step for you, these are scenarios where you may be able to prove that you are entitled to a divorce based on the wrongdoing (or fault) of your spouse.

Here are twelve fault grounds that may justify divorce (this is a basic list and does not cover all of the legal consideration involved in these matters):

1. Natural impotency
2. Adultery
3. Being sentenced to any penitentiary
4. Willful, continued, and obstinate desertion for one year
5. Habitual drunkenness
6. Habitual drug use
7. Habitual cruel and unusual treatment
8. Mental illness or intellectual disability not known of at the time of marriage
9. Marriage to another person at the time of pretended marriage
10. Pregnancy of the wife by another person
11. Incest
12. Incurable mental illness

Again, the reasons listed above are for reference only, and do not fully explain every detail of each ground for divorce. If you think that divorce may be a necessary step for you, you should consult a family law attorney. There are plenty of reasons why you should hire a lawyer to help with important decisions like divorce. Some issues to be considered in divorce are division of marital property, assets and debt, division of retirement income/benefits, child support, custody, and visitation. The Wade Law Firm is well-prepared and committed to assist clients throughout Mississippi.

If you would like help navigating the numerous legal, financial, and emotional aspects of divorce, contact us today. The Wade Law Firm, Jackson, Mississippi Divorce and Family Law Attorney, is ready to answer your questions! Give us a call at 601.790.0043 or contact us online to discuss your legal matters in a confidential, affordable consultation.

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Special Cases: Deviating From Child Support Guidelines

Welcome to Metro Jackson and Central Mississippi Family Law Attorney, The Wade Law Firm, PLLC blog site!

Last week we talked about some of the statutory guidelines that the State of Mississippi uses to determine how much child support payments should be. Whether you are receiving child support payments or you’re the one paying for child support, you should take a look at the guidelines. They will give you a good idea on the subject, however, child support payments can be adjusted over time based on a material change in circumstances for the child or the non-custodial parent.

If you think you’re paying too much, or not receiving sufficient child support for your child, keep reading as we cover some of the basics of modifying child support payments.

Yes, child support payments can be adjusted.

The guidelines for child support payments are just that – guidelines. They are presumed to be proper, but they can often be changed if you can prove to the court that the amount is inappropriate. There are several different factors that the court will examine to decide whether or not the amount of child support should be changed. Just like the guidelines, these factors are written into Mississippi law. You can find them at § 43-19-103 of the Mississippi Code.

Here’s a simplified list of the some of the more common reasons for modifying child support payments:

Extraordinary medical, psychological, educational, or dental expenses

Sometimes a child may have a serious illness, need psychological treatments, or need to attend a special school to reach his or her full potential. Since child support is determined “in the best interests of the child,” the court will sometimes adjust the amount of child support payments to meet these extraordinary expenses.

Independent income of the child

As children grow older, he or she may become financially independent and not rely on the support of either the custodial or noncustodial parent. Child support obligations may need to be adjusted to account for this.

The payment of both child support and spousal support to one party

Through divorce proceedings, the court may order or one party may agree to pay support of their former spouse and support for children. Paying both of these can become financially impossible for the person paying. If you can convince the court that you are paying too much, the court may reduce your child support payments to lessen your financial burden.

Seasonal changes in the amount of both parent’s income

Plenty of people will see the amount of money they make alter throughout the year. Maybe one parent works in landscaping, and makes far more money during the summers than winter. It may be inequitable to make that person pay child support payments that reflect high-paying summer months, when money is tight during the winter. Likewise, you shouldn’t have to pinch pennies with small payments when the paying parent is making far more money during other parts of the year. Again, if convinced, the court may modify the amount of child support to match your specific situation.

Special shared parental arrangements or the refusal of the paying parent to be involved in the life of the child

This factor can sound a little confusing at first, but it’s fairly straightforward. An example of a special shared parental arrangement may be a situation where the paying parent spends more time than usual with the child. For example, if the paying parent takes care of the child for half of the week, he or she is likely spending a lot of money looking after the child. Because of this, it may not be fair for that parent to pay as much child support as the guidelines may recommend. On the other hand, if the paying parent doesn’t help at all with the child, that parent should probably pay more since they aren’t contributing as much to non-monetary childcare.

Wrapping up

These are just a few of the many factors that Mississippi courts consider when deciding whether to modify child support payments. If you think you’re paying too much child support or are not receiving enough, you should speak to an experienced attorney who can help you navigate these sorts of issues.
Get in touch

Attorney Vangela M. Wade has over 18 years of legal experience representing countless clients navigating a variety of difficult situations. As one of Metro Jackson and Central Mississippi’s best family law attorneys, The Wade Law Firm, PLLC is ready to answer your questions about child support or other legal areas where you may have questions.

Give us a call at 601.790.0043 or contact us online to discuss your legal matters in a confidential, affordable consultation.

Get social with The Wade Law Firm and follow us on Facebook and Twitter!

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Modifying Child Support: To Do or Not To Do… That IS the Question

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Welcome to Mississippi Family Law and Divorce Attorney, The Wade Law Firm, PLLC blog site.

On The Wade Law Firm blog, we recently discussed some of the scenarios that may allow courts to decide on a child support payment order that is higher or lower than the suggested statutory guidelines. These were certain, limited situations that occur at the time the court originally sets the amount of child support payments paid by the non-custodial parent (parent who doesn’t have physical custody of the child).

But what about later on down the road? What if someone loses his or her job, gets married again, or develops a serious health or behavioral problem? Will any of these life changing factors support or justify a modification of child support?

If you think your child support order needs to be raised or lowered, you should get familiar with Mississippi’s legal standard for modifying child support – “a material change in circumstances.” You’ll have to go to court to change a child support order, and these are the questions the court may ask when deciding what to do:

• Has there been a material change in circumstances that justifies modifying the amount of child support to be paid?

A material change in circumstances can happen in a number of ways. One of the most common reasons that child support is adjusted downward is that the paying parent has lost his or her job. Of course, the job loss must be involuntary. Quitting a job does not justify a lower child support payment. Child support payments are commonly raised when a child develops a medical condition that makes higher support payments necessary for the benefit of the child. The paying parent receiving a raise is not enough to justify higher payments.

• Has the change occurred after the last decree that decided your child support obligations?

The change in circumstances must be new. If the issue existed when child support was first decided, it’s likely too late to modify payments now.

• Was the change in circumstances foreseeable?

This is similar to the last question. The court will give great weight to the first determination of child support payments and will assume that all issues regarding who should pay–and how much–have been sorted out. If the change in circumstances was something you and the other parent knew was likely to occur, it should have been covered before.

For example, if the parent and child were planning to move to a new, more expensive city when the court first decided on child support payments, higher bills associated with moving won’t justify higher child support payments. After all, the change in expenses was foreseeable.

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Thoughts? Questions?

We hope you have a bit more knowledge on a few of the basic issues that may come into play if you are considering a modification of child support payments in Mississippi. If you think that you may need to increase or decrease child support payments in your case, get in touch with Attorney Vangela M. Wade.

As one of Metro Jackson and Central Mississippi’s best family law attorneys, we serve our clients with personalized legal advice and solutions with compassionate counsel.

With more than 18 years of legal practice and experience, The Wade Law Firm, PLLC is here to answer your questions. Give us a call at 601.790.0043 or contact us online.

Don’t forget to “like” us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter!

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Determining Child Support Payments in Mississippi

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Welcome to Metro Jackson and Central Mississippi Family Law Attorney, The Wade Law Firm blog site!

In Mississippi, one of the more common reasons people head to the courthouse is to resolve a family law matter. Of the family issues that are most commonly litigated, child support payments rise to the top of the list. Some of the reasons for this are obvious. First, in most cases a child is considered by law to be dependent of one or more custodial parent or caregiver until he or she turns 21 years old or is emancipated under the laws of the State of Mississippi. This means that the needs of the child will change over time. After all, a high school student likely needs more money for books, clothes, and transportation expenses than a toddler.

When it comes to child support, are you concerned about how much you should be paying? How much should you expect to receive from the father or mother of your child? Taking a quick look at Mississippi’s statutory guidelines can help.

However, figuring out just how much child support payments should be is not an easy task. Every parent and every family is different. Some people are financially stable, but some are not. Many people pay their child support obligations on time, but again, some do not. For reasons like these, the Mississippi legislature has established legal guidelines to help courts decide how to structure child support payments. At the end of the day, a lot of decision-making for child support issues is left up to the court to decide. After all, courts are instructed to make all decisions, “in the best interests of the child.”

What Happens in the Initial Steps

Most often the court adjudicates custody to one parent or the other, or the parents can agree on who will be the custodial parent. Usually, the parent with physical custody of the minor child or children will receive child support payments from the non-custodial parent on behalf of the minor child or children. The determination of child support payments gets slightly trickier from here.

First, the court determines the income of the non-custodial, or paying parent. The income is calculated by finding the paying parent’s adjusted gross income.

Adjusted gross income is the amount of money from “all potential sources that may reasonably be expected to be available to the absent parent.” This income includes wages, salary, money from self-employment, investments, commissions, and many other sources. From this income, the court subtracts certain qualifying payments like taxes to determine the absent parent’s adjusted gross income. Once the absent parent’s adjusted gross income is sorted out, the court should direct a statutory percentage of that money towards child support.

The law recommends that the court adjust the percentage of income for child support based on the number of children to be supported.

How The Percentages Break Down:

1 Child = 14% of Adjusted Gross Income
2 Children = 20% of Adjusted Gross Income
3 Children = 22% of Adjusted Gross Income
4 Children = 24% of Adjusted Gross Income
5+ Children = 26% of Adjusted Gross Income

For example, a non-custodial parent with an annual adjusted gross income of $80,000 may pay $16,000 (20%) annually in child support payments for two children.

While the statutory directions are certainly helpful in estimating how much child support payments someone should be paying, they are not set in stone. As is common with many legal issues, the correct answer is often “it depends.”

For instance, the law directs the court to make a finding in writing as to whether these percentages are justifiable if the paying parent makes less than $10,000 per year or more than $100,000. In addition, the guidelines are a “rebuttable presumption,” meaning they can be adjusted if one side proves that the statutory percentage is not appropriate.

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Why You Need a Child Support Attorney

Mississippi’s statutory guidelines for child support are yet another example of why it’s important to get the help of an attorney. While these guidelines are useful, they are no replacement for the services of a committed and experienced lawyer. With so many questions and arising situations, you’ll feel at ease knowing a professional advocate is by your side.

In fact, check out these five reasons why you may need an attorney.

Get In Touch

Attorney Vangela M. Wade has over 18 years of legal experience representing countless clients navigating a variety of difficult situations. As one of Mississippi’s best Family Law attorneys, The Wade Law Firm, PLLC is ready to answer your questions! Give us a call at 601.790.0043 or contact us online to discuss your legal matters in a confidential, affordable consultation.

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Top Five Reasons Why You Need an Attorney

Attorney Vangela M. Wade

Welcome to Metro Jackson and Central Mississippi Family Law Attorney, The Wade Law Firm, PLLC blog!

We’ve all seen legal dramas unfold on television or in movies. Sometimes great lawyers argue back in forth in and out of the courtroom. Other times the “average Joe” puts on a nice shirt, makes a stirring speech in the courtroom, and wins his case against all odds. It makes for great entertainment! Unfortunately, real life legal issues often require a lot more than a few pretty words strung together. Maybe it’s fine to appear alone to defend against a simple speeding ticket or a parking violation, but Family Law matters like divorce, child support, child custody, and visitation issues demand a zealous and professional advocate. Not to mention the need for experienced legal representation to help you navigate your rights and liabilities.

Here are the top five reasons why you need an attorney:

1. Law is Complicated

Navigating Mississippi Family Laws, Chancery Court Rules and Procedures is not easy. The history of law is full of examples of well-meaning people who found themselves in trouble as a result of ill-fated attempts to be their own attorneys. For one, legal disputes in general can become very frustrating. Multiply that frustration by 100 to begin to understand the emotional impact and frustration of Divorce, contested or uncontested, child custody disputes, child support modifications, and other matters intersecting the lives of loved ones. A professional lawyer is well trained and emotionally neutral. Attorneys tend to focus on the facts and the law. This means even when times get tough, your lawyer aims to focus on representing your or your child’s best interest to achieve the best result, not just winning the argument. Lawyers can navigate complicated rules and know what to say (and sometimes what not to say).

2. Attorneys Know How and Where to File Important Documents

Whether you need help with a divorce, child custody, will and probate issues, or a personal injury case, you need to follow the right procedures. How long do you have to file the necessary paperwork? Do you know where to file your papers? How long do you have until you can appear before a judge? These procedural issues are extremely important. Especially in Mississippi, not following the official procedural regulations can result in dismissal of your case or losing. Either could mean a disruption in your family life the well being of its youngest most fragile members. This is a very technical area where only a professional attorney can be trusted to get it right.

3. The Other Party Will Have an Attorney

What’s worse than appearing in court as your own lawyer is the possibility of representing yourself when your opponent has the legal help that you are without. If you’re dealing with a misdemeanor or felony criminal charge, you can be guaranteed the prosecuting attorney’s job is not representing your best interest but more likely working to convict you. In a civil case dealing with issues like bankruptcy and contested divorce and estate probate, going against an opposing attorney is just as likely. Don’t risk litigating without your trusted lawyer by your side.

4. Lawyers Can Help You Compromise

Sometimes winning your case outright may not be a realistic option. Like many other areas of life, compromise is often the best way to resolve a legal issue. An experienced attorney will likely have handled cases similar to yours before. The attorney will know what is a reasonable outcome for your specific case. With specialized legal experience and a good professional reputation, a knowledgeable lawyer can help you solve your problems in a quicker, less stressful manner. An experienced Family Law Attorney can guide and represent you in the process where the judge’s ultimate concern is the “best interests of the child” not absolute win or loss or even fairness to the parties.

5. Having an Attorney May Actually Save You Money

Sure, hiring a lawyer may not sound like an inexpensive affair, but proceeding without a professional attorney can often be far more costly. Losing a criminal case may mean you face a higher fines and other fees that go along with it. In addition, not hiring a lawyer to help with a civil case could result in less time with your child, unfairly high or low child support or alimony payments, losing money in bankruptcy proceedings, or seeing property in a will be handed to the wrong person. There’s no doubt the cost of not hiring an attorney can easily cost you more than hiring one!

Mississippi Family Law and Divorce Attorney, Vangela M. Wade is here to answer your questions. Get in touch at 601.790.0043 or contact us online to discuss your legal matters in a confidential, affordable consultation.

The Wade Law Firm, PLLC is located in the Metro-Jackson area and is prepared to assist clients throughout Mississippi and the greater Mid-South area.

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Welcome to The Wade Law Firm, PLLC Blog

The Wade Law Firm, PLLCThe Wade Law Firm, Metro Jackson and Central Mississippi Family Law and Life Planning Attorney, welcomes you to our blog. If you’ve found yourself on our site, you’re at the right place for legal advice and compassionate counsel. Based in Jackson, Mississippi, The Wade Law Firm, PLLC provides clients in the Jackson Metro Area and throughout Central Mississippi with a full range of quality legal services contested and uncontested.

Family Law

  • Contested Divorce
  • Uncontested Divorce or Irreconcilable Differences Divorce
  • Prenuptial Agreements
  • Child Support
  • Child Custody
  • Visitation
  • Grandparent Visitation
  • Adoption
  • Legitimation/Paternity
  • Guardianships
  • Birth Certificate Corrections and Name Changes

Wills, Estates and Life Planning

  • Wills
  • Trusts
  • Estate Planning
  • Powers of Attorney
  • Advance Health Care Directives
  • Elder Law
  • Probate
  • Heirships
  • Conservatorships
  • Asset Protection Services

In most uncontested legal matters, we’re able to offer a predictable schedule of flat fees for many of your legal needs. Say goodbye to unpredictable and outrageous attorney’s fees! When you work with The Wade Law Firm, you know exactly what you’re paying for and how much you will pay.

Attorney Vangela M. Wade combines diverse life experiences, and more than 18 years of legal practice and knowledge of Mississippi Family Law, to serve the needs of clients whose objectives and goals require personalized solutions to their legal problems. Get in touch with The Wade Law Firm, PLLC today.

Attorney Vangela M. Wade

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